Kurious About Kamut

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

The deadline for the Wayfare Foods contest has been extended!  Get your entries in before 8pm on Sunday, February 26th to win some tasty vegan “Pig Outs” bacon bits!

Has anyone else tried Kamut?  I picked up a bit of it at the co-op recently and realized when I got it home that I hadn’t the faintest idea how to cook it, let alone what recipes to use it in.  Fortunately, this post from Chef In You answered both questions at once!  Though it’s called Kamut and Mixed Greens Pilaf, it’s really more like a stir fry that uses Kamut instead of rice.

vegan kamut stir fry
There’s really not a while lot to making this dish.  I made sure I had everything ready beforehand by cooking the Kamut in the morning.  I also baked my own tofu using the recipe in Appetite For Reduction as a starting point.  That one calls for several ingredients that wouldn’t have tasted right with the stir fry seasonings, so I left those out and stuck with a basic marinade of veggie broth, liquid aminos and garlic.  I’ve never tried any ready-made varieties of baked tofu, but I bet an Asian-flavored one would work well here.

I went with fresh garlic and ginger for seasoning, along with a little Asian chili paste diluted in water since I didn’t have spicy stir fry sauce.  For the greens, I used a mix of kale and mustard greens.  Now that I’ve had them, I feel like I should have tried mustard greens a long time ago.  They have a sort of fresh, tangy/spicy flavor that I wound up enjoying a lot, both in this dish and raw in salads on subsequent days.  I think chard, spinach or even broccoli rabe would also be good for the “greens” part, depending on how sweet or bitter you like your greens.

vegan kamut pilaf meal
The texture and taste of the Kamut turned out not to be too different from wheat berries, at least to me.  It has a similar crunch and hearty wheat flavor, which made for a nice change from rice.  It’d be good to use as the base for other bowl-type recipes, perhaps something with broccoli rabe and tempeh.  I’d imagine you could also swap it for rice in certain bean and rice dishes to put a new twist on them.  If you haven’t tried Kamut yet, I recommend the pilaf/stir fry recipe because it’s so simple and delicious!

My brother also got some Kamut around the same time that I did, but he sprouted his and said it was pretty tasty.  I’m not enterprising enough to start sprouting my own grains yet, but it’s something I would like to try someday!  Sprouted or not, I can see Kamut making a hearty breakfast dish as well.

Question for the comments: Have you tried Kamut?  What did you do with it?

About The Author

Sam has been a vegan since summer of 2009 and has spent the subsequent years experimenting with all manner of vegan food. She holds a Certificate in Plant-Based Nutrition from the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies and is a graduate of the Bauman College Nutrition Consultant Program. She is a member of Toastmasters International and currently serves as part of the Capital View Toastmasters club. When she's not blogging or cooking, Sam likes to read, play silly card games and knit socks.

Connect with Sam

2 comments for “Kurious About Kamut

  1. jamie.lockman@kamut.com'
    02/27/2012 at 11:39 AM

    Yum! Your Asian stir fry with KAMUT(R), tofu, and greens, sounds delicious! In 1990, “KAMUT” was registered as a trademark by the Quinn family in order to support organic farming and preserve an ancient wheat variety, khorasan. Under the KAMUT® Brand name, khorasan wheat must always be grown organically, never be hybridized or modified, and contain high levels of purity and nutrition. Today, Kamut International owns and has registered the KAMUT® trademark in over 40 countries and is responsible for production and marketing of all KAMUT® Brand khorasan wheat throughout the world.

    • Sam
      02/27/2012 at 12:27 PM

      Thanks for the info, Jamie! I didn’t know all of that stuff about KAMUT! 🙂

Comments are closed.